Start, Hungaroring, 2006

Start shots: Hungarian Grand Prix

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Fernando Alonso drove one of the greatest first laps of all time at a wet Hungaroring at the start of the 2006 Hungarian Grand Prix. Take a look back on some of the most memorable starts to Hungary’s round of the world championship.

1987

Start, Hungaroring, 1987

Over 200,000 spectators turned up to watch Nelson Piquet Hungary’s first round of the world championship in 1986. Twelve months later Piquet won again, but he only hit the front with six laps to go when team mate Nigel Mansell – who had led from the start – lost a wheel nut and retired. The Ferraris of Gerhard Berger and Michele Alboreto headed Piquet early on but also dropped out.

1995

Start, Hungaroring, 1995

The Hungaroring’s reputation as an overtaking-free zone had been cemented by the mid-nineties, making the opening seconds of each race especially crucial. Damon Hill won in 1995, leading every lap of the way in a rare triumph over Michael Schumacher at a track where Hill was usually at his best.

2001

Start, Hungaroring, 2001

Six years later the Hungaroring saw its second championship-deciding race, Schumacher clinching his fourth title as early as August. A one-two for Ferrari also netted the constructors’ championship title.

Start, Hungaroring, 2001

2002

Start, Hungaroring, 2002

The 2002 race was the last which used the original turn one configuration at the Hungaroring. Ferrari wrapped up another constructors’ championship but this time it was Rubens Barrichello was allowed to win, Schumacher having already sealed the drivers’ title.

Start, Hungaroring, 2002

2003

Start, Hungaroring, 2003

An odd-numbered grid spot was the thing to have in 2003. On a dusty surface following extensive redevelopment work at the track, the racing line offered far better grip and the extended run to turn one made a poor start more costly.

As the field accelerated out of the new, tighter turn one the top four places were held by the drivers who’d started first, third, fifth and seventh: Fernando Alonso, Mark Webber, Rubens Barrichello and Kimi Raikkonen.

2006

Start, Hungaroring, 2006

On a damp track in 2006 Alonso performed one of the greatest first laps of all time. A penalty due to a practice altercation with Robert Doornbos left him 15th on the grid, yet he rose to sixth by the end of the first tour. Raikkonen led initially but crashed into Vitantonio Liuzzi while lapping the Toro Rosso. Alonso later took the lead but lost a wheel following a pit stop and spun out. That left Jenson Button, who had started 14th, to claim his first grand prix victory.

Start, Hungaroring, 2006

2007

Start, Hungaroring, 2007

The Hungaroring was a hotbed of controversy twelve months later. Alonso had blocked team mate Lewis Hamilton in the McLaren pit box during qualifying in retaliation for Hamilton refusing to let him past earlier in the session. The stewards relegated Alonso from pole position to sixth on the grid: Hamilton took his spot at the sharp end and won the race, but Alonso’s fury had already set in motion a chain of events which led to McLaren’s expulsion from the championship.

2008

Felipe Massa, Lewis Hamilton, Hungaroring, 2008

McLaren occupied the front row in 2008 but a superb launch by Felipe Massa from third on the grid got him around the outside of Hamilton and into the lead. He controlled the race until an engine failure three laps from home, which handed Heikki Kovalainen his only F1 victory.

2009

Start, Hungaroring, 2009

Alonso took an unlikely pole position in 2009 driving the unfancied Renault R29. But in a repeat of the race three years earlier a pit stop error left him with three wheels on his wagon. A slow start by second-placed Sebastian Vettel allowed team mate Mark Webber into second, but behind him the KERS-boosted Hamilton and Kimi Raikkonen were on their way to the top two positions.

2010

Start, Hungaroring, 2010

Red Bull owned the front row in 2010 but Alonso’s fast-starting Ferrari split the pair of them, exiting turn one with Vettel ahead and Webber behind. This proved to be a pivotal development: later in the race Red Bull opted to leave Webber out when the Safety Car appeared, putting him in the lead ahead of Vettel and Alonso. Vettel was then told to delay the field to help Webber come out in front of Alonso after his eventual pit stop. Vettel, however, slowed the field too much during the Safety Car period, earning himself a penalty. Webber won the race and moved into the lead of the drivers’ championship.

2011

Start, Hungaroring, 2011

Vettel led from pole again in 2011 but this there was the added challenge of a wet track. The McLaren drivers scrapped hard but Hamilton held off Button for second. Behind them Nico Rosberg rocketed out of turn one, passing both Ferraris, and team mate Schumacher followed him through.

Start, Hungaroring, 2011

2012

Start, Hungaroring, 2012

Following an aborted start due to Schumacher stalling on the grid, Hamilton made the most of his pole position while Vettel’s attempt to pass Romain Grosjean ended up costing him third to Button.

2013

Start, Hungaroring, 2013

Hamilton was on pole again 12 months later, and once more Vettel was scrapping with Grosjean. After losing out to Vettel, Grosjean had to get his elbows out to keep Alonso behind at turn three.

Start, Hungaroring, 2013

2014

Start, Hungaroring, 2014

A turbo fire in qualifying robbed Hamilton of the chance to take his third pole in a row. On a wet track, Rosberg kept his advantage from pole position while Vettel was passed by Valtteri Bottas and Alonso. Meanwhile Hamilton, who had started from the pits, spun off at turn two. That might have been that, but a crash for Marcus Ericsson’s Caterham brought out the Safety Car which completely changed the complexion of the race.

Start, Hungaroring, 2014

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Keith Collantine
Lifelong motor sport fan Keith set up RaceFans in 2005 - when it was originally called F1 Fanatic. Having previously worked as a motoring...

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  • 24 comments on “Start shots: Hungarian Grand Prix”

    1. LotsOfControl (@for-unlawful-carnal-knowledge)
      21st July 2015, 12:55

      One thing strikes out for me. The grid gets uglier and less recognisable from one year to another.

      Look at the 1987 cars. Diverse in shape and color. Last year is the nearest thing to that.

      1. @for-unlawful-carnal-knowledge I think that just has to do with the fact we can simulate almost everything nowadays and teams will more quickly find the ideal solution to a problem.

    2. leading every lap of the way in a rare triumph over Michael Schumacher at a track where Hill was usually at his best.

      This made me wonder, we all know Clark is the Grand Slam man but on which track were most Grand Slams taken?

    3. In 2001 “Hungaroring saw its only championship-deciding race” – how dare you forget about Our Nige in 1992, Keith!

      1. @unicron2002 Good point! Both pretty unmemorable championship contests, it must be said.

      2. Speaking about Mansell and the Hungaroring, the ´89-race may be mentionable as well. He went from 12 to 8 to the first corner, picking up the other positions later in the race.

    4. The Renault R29 in 2009 got pole, wow. I’d erased that car’s existence from my memory because it was such an ugly duckling which did nothing of note – save for this pole.

      1. with about 5 laps less fuel on-board.

    5. 1997 was a great race. Hill starting 3rd, overtaking Schumacher early on and then Schumacher holding up the rest leaving Hill to pull away. It would have an epic win for Hill and it would have been the biggest upsets of all time.

    6. 2006 Hungary was indeed the best opening lap and brilliant drive by Alonso. I think that surpassed Donnington 1993 as well.

      1. Yes. Alonso was brilliant

    7. Diogo Soares
      21st July 2015, 16:18

      Awesome pictures, but what about 2008? Incredible start from Massa to 1st locking hugely the wheels!!!

      1. I’ve added it now, thanks for the suggestion.

    8. Shame you missed the 2008 start, there’s a great photo of Massa locking both front brakes having taken the lead from 3rd on the grid.

    9. In the 2009 photo there’s only one Ferrari. Felipe Massa was in hospital following his accident the day before.

    10. 2006 Hungarian Grand Prix

      http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2f2z9f

      Alonso was an absolute monster in this race, simply out of this world. He started 15th and overtook NINE cars on the opening lap. Before Raikkonen’s crash brought out the safety car on lap 26, he was 39 seconds ahead of the McLaren’s while not even at 40% race distance. Insanity. Alonso was Senna-esque that race.

      1. Fernando 150% Alonso
        22nd July 2015, 10:30

        That race made me an Alo fan! ;)

    11. How about 2005, I seem to remember Christian Klien (blast from the past) getting flipped over at turn 1, I’m pretty sure that was at the start

    12. Keith….Pretty sure Button beat Hamilton and everybody in 2011!

    13. I feel as though Alonso’s first lap in 2006 was underrated. As in it was never hailed as one of the greatest, but looking at the onboard, it impressed me more than Senna in Donington 1993.

    14. Shame you couldn’t put 2008. That was truly one of the best starts by any driver that year.

    15. ” Schumacher clinching his fourth title as early as August.” and “Ferrari wrapped up another constructors’ championship […] Schumacher having already sealed the drivers’ title.”

      Clearly the championship was way more exciting back then compared to 2014/15 (sarcasm)

    16. I think Felipe Massa won’t be too happy about this article

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