2018 Japanese Grand Prix interactive data: lap charts, times and tyres

2018 Japanese Grand Prix

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Lewis Hamilton was on course for a ‘grand slam’ in the Japanese Grand Prix having started from pole position, led all the way and set fastest lap with two tours to go.

But his (almost) vanquished championship rival Sebastian Vettel took Hamilton’s fastest lap away, denying him an otherwise perfect weekend’s work.

Vettel had little else to do for more than half the race after his collision with Max Verstappen which dropped him to 19th and last. He recovered sixth place with little difficulty but was never likely to catch the rest, although his team mate dropped back late in the race following the Virtual Safety Car period. Indeed the other Ferrari driver’s best lap of the race was only the 12th-fastest.

Another driver who struggled after the VSC was Pierre Gasly, who lost his place in the top 10 to Carlos Sainz Jnr.

2018 Japanese Grand Prix lap chart

The positions of each driver on every lap. Click name to highlight, right-click to reset. Toggle drivers using controls below:

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2018 Japanese Grand Prix race chart

The gaps between each driver on every lap compared to the leader’s average lap time. Very large gaps omitted. Scroll to zoom, drag to pan and right-click to reset. Toggle drivers using controls below:

Position change

Driver Start position Lap one position change Race position change
Lewis Hamilton 1 0 0
Valtteri Bottas 2 0 0
Sebastian Vettel 8 4 2
Kimi Raikkonen 4 -1 -1
Daniel Ricciardo 15 1 11
Max Verstappen 3 0 0
Sergio Perez 9 1 2
Esteban Ocon 11 2 2
Lance Stroll 14 -3 -3
Sergey Sirotkin 17 -1 1
Nico Hulkenberg 16 0
Carlos Sainz Jnr 13 2 3
Pierre Gasly 7 0 -4
Brendon Hartley 6 -4 -7
Romain Grosjean 5 -1 -3
Kevin Magnussen 12 0
Fernando Alonso 18 3 4
Stoffel Vandoorne 19 0 4
Marcus Ericsson 20 0 8
Charles Leclerc 10 -3

2018 Japanese Grand Prix lap times

All the lap times by the drivers (in seconds, very slow laps excluded). Scroll to zoom, drag to pan and toggle drivers using the control below:

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2018 Japanese Grand Prix fastest laps

Each driver’s fastest lap:

Rank Driver Car Fastest lap Gap On lap
1 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 1’32.318 53
2 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1’32.785 0.467 51
3 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 1’33.110 0.792 46
4 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull-TAG Heuer 1’33.187 0.869 50
5 Lance Stroll Williams-Mercedes 1’33.354 1.036 41
6 Max Verstappen Red Bull-TAG Heuer 1’33.367 1.049 50
7 Fernando Alonso McLaren-Renault 1’33.943 1.625 28
8 Sergey Sirotkin Williams-Mercedes 1’33.985 1.667 41
9 Sergio Perez Force India-Mercedes 1’34.073 1.755 43
10 Pierre Gasly Toro Rosso-Honda 1’34.133 1.815 35
11 Carlos Sainz Jnr Renault 1’34.197 1.879 50
12 Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 1’34.223 1.905 28
13 Charles Leclerc Sauber-Ferrari 1’34.515 2.197 37
14 Esteban Ocon Force India-Mercedes 1’34.670 2.352 50
15 Romain Grosjean Haas-Ferrari 1’34.786 2.468 47
16 Brendon Hartley Toro Rosso-Honda 1’34.857 2.539 30
17 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 1’34.934 2.616 32
18 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren-Renault 1’35.023 2.705 25
19 Marcus Ericsson Sauber-Ferrari 1’36.294 3.976 8
20 Kevin Magnussen Haas-Ferrari 1’39.908 7.590 6

2018 Japanese Grand Prix tyre strategies

The tyre strategies for each driver:

Stint 1 Stint 2 Stint 3
Lewis Hamilton Soft (24) Medium (29)
Valtteri Bottas Soft (23) Medium (30)
Max Verstappen Super soft (21) Soft (32)
Daniel Ricciardo Soft (23) Medium (30)
Kimi Raikkonen Super soft (17) Medium (36)
Sebastian Vettel Super soft (26) Soft (27)
Sergio Perez Super soft (24) Soft (29)
Romain Grosjean Soft (29) Medium (24)
Esteban Ocon Super soft (26) Medium (27)
Carlos Sainz Jnr Soft (32) Medium (20)
Pierre Gasly Super soft (29) Soft (23)
Marcus Ericsson Soft (5) Medium (47)
Brendon Hartley Super soft (28) Soft (24)
Fernando Alonso Soft (26) Medium (26)
Stoffel Vandoorne Soft (23) Medium (29)
Sergey Sirotkin Soft (4) Medium (34) Super soft (14)
Lance Stroll Soft (14) Medium (25) Super soft (13)
Charles Leclerc Soft (4) Medium (31) Soft (3)
Nico Hulkenberg Medium (30) Soft (7)
Kevin Magnussen Soft (2) Medium (6)

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2018 Japanese Grand Prix pit stop times

How long each driver’s pit stops took:

Driver Team Pit stop time Gap On lap
1 Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 22.614 24
2 Sebastian Vettel Ferrari 22.748 0.134 26
3 Valtteri Bottas Mercedes 22.777 0.163 23
4 Kimi Raikkonen Ferrari 22.781 0.167 17
5 Daniel Ricciardo Red Bull 22.864 0.250 23
6 Brendon Hartley Toro Rosso 23.110 0.496 28
7 Stoffel Vandoorne McLaren 23.159 0.545 23
8 Marcus Ericsson Sauber 23.244 0.630 5
9 Esteban Ocon Force India 23.316 0.702 26
10 Pierre Gasly Toro Rosso 23.376 0.762 29
11 Carlos Sainz Jnr Renault 23.477 0.863 32
12 Nico Hulkenberg Renault 23.555 0.941 30
13 Sergio Perez Force India 23.635 1.021 24
14 Sergey Sirotkin Williams 23.647 1.033 38
15 Lance Stroll Williams 23.657 1.043 14
16 Sergey Sirotkin Williams 23.660 1.046 4
17 Romain Grosjean Haas 23.692 1.078 29
18 Charles Leclerc Sauber 26.672 4.058 35
19 Fernando Alonso McLaren 27.454 4.840 26
20 Max Verstappen Red Bull 28.789 6.175 21
21 Kevin Magnussen Haas 29.007 6.393 2
22 Lance Stroll Williams 29.804 7.190 39
23 Charles Leclerc Sauber 38.891 16.277 4

2018 Japanese Grand Prix

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Author information

Keith Collantine
Lifelong motor sport fan Keith set up RaceFans in 2005 - when it was originally called F1 Fanatic. Having previously worked as a motoring...

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5 comments on “2018 Japanese Grand Prix interactive data: lap charts, times and tyres”

  1. Little bit pedantic but Vettel took fastest lap of Hamilton on lap 52 win 1.32.6 then improved on it with his last lap

    1. @pantherjag Oh that’s some good pedantry. I’d be proud of that one. I’ll tweak the text.

      1. Such desperate behavior from Seb. Sad to see him wasting the seat at the front of the grid and a Ferrari seat no less.

  2. Why do the cars with the fastest laps also have the fastest pit stops?

    Can they afford more athletic mechanics, or do their mechanics train harder because they are more afraid of letting their driver down?

    Perhaps it is because both drivers and mechanics are given better equipment.

    1. Maybe it’s because the bigger teams have more mechanics

Comments are closed.