FIA, Circuit de Catalunya

FIA sets up ‘Ethics and Compliance Hotline’

RaceFans Round-up

Posted on

| Written by

In the round-up: The FIA is offering a new hotline for the reporting of ethical violations, anti-doping violations and matters relating to sporting integrity.

Social media

Notable posts from Twitter, Instagram and more:

Advert | Become a RaceFans supporter and go ad-free

Advert | Become a RaceFans supporter and go ad-free

Comment of the day

What should come after the current V6 hybrid turbo engine formula?

I hope the new engine formula will allow for lighter and shorter cars. No idea what will be mandated, but if the workings can be packaged into smaller confines and with less weight, I would be happy.
@EuroBrun

Happy birthday!

Happy birthday to Lustigson and Zazeems!

If you want a birthday shout-out tell us when yours is via the contact form or adding to the list here.

On this day in F1

Danny Sullivan, Mario Andretti, Indianapolis 500, 1985
Danny Sullivan, Mario Andretti, Indianapolis 500, 1985
  • 35 years ago today former F1 driver Danny Sullivan memorably won the Indianapolis 500 despite spinning mid-race

Author information

Keith Collantine
Lifelong motor sport fan Keith set up RaceFans in 2005 - when it was originally called F1 Fanatic. Having previously worked as a motoring...

Got a potential story, tip or enquiry? Find out more about RaceFans and contact us here.

Posted on Categories RaceFans Round-upTags , , ,

Promoted content from around the web | Become a RaceFans Supporter to hide this ad and others

  • 12 comments on “FIA sets up ‘Ethics and Compliance Hotline’”

    1. Be interesting to know the motivation behind the new FIA ethics hotline.
      Could it possibly have been set up because it suspected that a certain engine provider was cheating but couldn’t find any proof?

      1. Not really
        “The FIA is offering a new hotline for the reporting of ethical violations, anti-doping violations and matters relating to sporting integrity.”
        It’s literally written there
        Oh sorry you were joking

        1. ColdFly (@)
          26th May 2020, 8:04

          Read your own comment again Jeorge

          “matters related to sporting integrity.” It’s literally written there

      2. I didn’t know the fia was religious.

      3. ColdFly (@)
        26th May 2020, 7:34

        It seems more like a half hearted attempt to comply with EU regulations than a sincere ‘hotline’. The reporting tool is web based only, in just 3 languages (not in Italian), no anonymous follow up route, and fairly high hurdled.
        There are much better solutions around if you want to be serious about enabling whistle blowing.

      4. @dbradock The FIA has set up hotlines twice in the past (the earliest as far back as 2003). I wonder what happened to the last one…

    2. FIA Hotline – “web-based … reporting mechanism” “full confidentiality”.

      Best of luck to those who believe their accusations will be safe from prying eyes & loose lips.

      1. @Jon Bee Seems I need to send the FIA a copy of a decent book on cybersecurity. Because web-based reporting mechanisms don’t offer full confidentiality (although at least the site has a properly-configured HTTPS certificate, which is more than I’d dared hope for initially).

        I would also like to know how it came to be that the FIA thought it necessary to clarify, “This is not an emergency service. Please contact the relevant authorities (e.g. the police) in case of immediate danger!” at the bottom of the page. Because anyone attempting to use it as an emergency service wouldn’t be scrolling far enough to see it…

    3. I agree with the COTD, although there are also other measures to reduce the overall weight. It isn’t only about the PU.

    4. NASCAR strategies just baffle me sometimes…why pit from the lead with so few laps to go when none of the other front runners do the same. Keselowski won the race on 45 lap old tyres…there was clearly no need to top.

      1. @geemac The leader is usually a sitting duck in times like these. Most teams strategies at this point is just do the opposite of what the leader does. If he pits, they stay out. If he stays out, they pit. You couldn’t beat him when all the conditions were the same, so mix it up and see what happens. Even then, which strategy works best is dependent on the number of cars that stay out.

        1. I agree with that as a general point, but Keselowski stayed out and still managed to fend off the pack on old tyres, while Chase Elliot finished 3rd (on the road) behind 2 cars that hadn’t. Given how few laps there were left to run staying out and keeping track position must have been the right call.

    Comments are closed.