David Coulthard, Red Bull, Melbourne, 2005

Single win for Williams while Red Bull rack up 114 in 20 seasons to overtake them

2024 Saudi Arabian GP stats and facts

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Red Bull scored their 114th grand prix victory last weekend, giving them more wins than Williams. Since Red Bull entered Formula 1 20 years ago, Williams has only won a single grand prix.

Williams scored their penultimate victory in the 2004 Brazilian Grand Prix – the last race before Red Bull’s arrival at the beginning of the following year. Red Bull’s ascendancy over the following years coincided with Williams’ decline.

Sebastian Vettel gave Red Bull their first grand prix victory at Shanghai in 2009. Three years later, while the new kids on the block were piling up championship silverware, Williams took their most recent win courtesy of Pastor Maldonado at the Circuit de Catalunya.

Thanks in no small part to the efforts of ex-Williams designer Adrian Newey, Red Bull have returned to dominant ways in recent seasons. With two dozen grands prix per year – 10 more than in Williams’ first season – Red Bull have caught and passed them from a standing start in two decades:

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Max Verstappen scored his ninth consecutive win last weekend, meaning he can equal his record of 10 in a row at the next round. He set that record in Italy last year, failed to win the next race in Singapore, then began his current winning streak, meaning he’s won an astonishing 19 of the last 20 races.

Max Verstappen, Red Bull, Jeddah Corniche Circuit, 2024
Verstappen can equal his 10-in-a-row record in Melbourne
As in Bahrain, Sergio Perez finished second, meaning Red Bull have started the season with back-to-back one-twos again. Last year they did this four times in the first five races but only twice more over the rest of the season.

Verstappen also picked up his 100th podium trophy. Impressively, he took just 187 starts to do so, though when that was pointed out to him he jokingly observed that showed how many podiums he’d “missed”.

“Of course, I’m very happy with that,” said Verstappen. “But I’m not really a guy looking at the stats, I’m just happy to hit 100.”

His latest win came after the 34th pole position of his career, which mean he now has more pole positions than all bar four other F1 drivers: Record-holder Lewis Hamilton on 104, plus Michael Schumacher, Ayrton Senna and Sebastian Vettel.

Verstappen claimed that pole position with the fastest ever lap of Jeddah, making amends for his near-miss in 2021 when he was on course to claim the top spot until he crashed at the final corner. He has now taken pole at 20 different tracks.

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However two things prevented Verstappen from repeating the ‘grand slam’ he achieved in Bahrain. Lando Norris took the lead through an early Safety Car period, becoming the only other driver to lead a lap this year, and Charles Leclerc beat Verstappen to the fastest lap, going a tenth of a second quicker than the Red Bull on the final tour.

Start, Suzuka, 2000
Four British drivers finished in the top 10 at Suzuka in 2000
Leclerc scored the eighth fastest lap of his career, giving him as many as champions James Hunt and Jenson Button, plus Gilles Villeneuve and Ralf Schumacher.

In addition to Leclerc and Verstappen, two other drivers set their fastest laps on the final tour. They were Alexander Albon and newcomer Oliver Bearman, substituting for Carlos Sainz Jnr at Ferrari.

Bearman acquitted himself superbly, taking points on his debut. He finished seventh, behind George Russell with Norris and Hamilton in pursuit. The official F1 website trumpeted this as the first time four British drivers had scored points in the same race since the 1968 French Grand Prix, which may be so, but is an odd basis for comparison as points were only awarded to the top six at that time.

Today points are scored by the top 10 finishers. The last time four British drivers appeared in the top 10 occured at the Japanese Grand Prix in 2000: David Coulthard third, Jenson Button fifth, and the Jaguars of Johnny Herbert and Eddie Irvine a then-pointless seventh and eighth.

There have been other, more recent, instances of four and even five drivers of the same nationality finishing in the top 10. Germany’s Nico Rosberg, Sebastian Vettel, Adrian Sutil, Michael Schumacher and Nico Hulkenberg did so at the British Grand Prix in 2010.

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Bearman was the first driver to make his F1 debut in a Ferrari since Arturo Merzario in the 1972 British Grand Prix. But while Bearman started 11th and finished seventh, Merzario rose from ninth to sixth.

Oliver Bearman, Ferrari, Jeddah Corniche Circuit, 2024
F1’s first driver who is younger than RaceFans
At 18 years and 307 days old, Bearman is the third-youngest driver ever to start a grand prix, behind Lance Stroll and Verstappen. The latter debuted at the age of 17 before the FIA introduced a minimum age of 18 years.

Bearman also stands out in one respect as far as RaceFans is concerned: He is the first driver to race in Formula 1 who was born after the website you are reading was founded!

Over to you

Have you spotted any other interesting stats and facts from the Saudi Arabian Grand Prix? Share them in the comments.

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2024 Saudi Arabian Grand Prix

Browse all 2024 Saudi Arabian Grand Prix articles

Author information

Keith Collantine
Lifelong motor sport fan Keith set up RaceFans in 2005 - when it was originally called F1 Fanatic. Having previously worked as a motoring...

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47 comments on “Single win for Williams while Red Bull rack up 114 in 20 seasons to overtake them”

  1. Oliver Bearman also became the youngest-ever driver to race for Ferrari at 18 years & 10 months or 307 days.

    Eddie Irvine was the most recent British-born (Northern Ireland but with Irish license) driver to race for Ferrari.

    Coincidently, the same five drivers got eliminated in Q1 as in Bahrain.

    The same front-row duo for the fourth consecutive race & would be fifth without the formation lap DNS in Brazil.

    The second consecutive Saudi Arabian GP DNF for Lance Stroll.

    The season’s first DNF honor went to Gasly, so at least Alpine beat all other teams in something, which is better than nothing.

    Red Bull Racing became the team with the fourth-most race wins.

    The last stat in the article is interesting, though, even if very trivial in the big picture, & something that was always going to happen eventually anyway, just like drivers born later than Senna’s fatal accident, for example, among many other combinations.

    1. Credit to original source? Of course not…

      Best leave it to @f1statsfan in future, eh?

      1. I’ve seen plenty of people make comments here without stating the source, ofc you’re never biased in terms of who you complain about.

  2. Red Bull’s 115th win puts them into fourth on the all-time wins total, surpassing Williams and behind only Mercedes on 125, McLaren on 183 and Ferrari on 243. For newer F1 fans it is likely very weird to see Ferrari having more wins than Red Bull and Mercedes combined yet not winning any championsip since 2008 constructor championship. Since 2009 Ferrari has just won 34 races versus Mercedes 116 wins and Red Bull 115 wins.

    Lewis has now gone five races without a top-six finish (8th Brazil, 7th Las Vegas, 9th Abu Dhabi, 7th Bahrain and 9th Saudi Arabia) his worst streak since 2009 where from Spanish race till Germany race he finished 9th, 12th, 13th, 16th and 18th followed by winning Hungary – on that logic Lewis might win Australia.

    Mercedes has broken their own record of 61 consecutive races (Brazil 2012 and Russia 2016) in the points, they are now on 62 races starting with 2021 French race.

    By leading 45 laps in Saudi Arabia, Max has overtaken Senna to 4th in most laps lead ranking with 2,960 laps. Ahead are Vettel with 3,501 laps, Schumacher 5,111 laps and Hamilton with 5,455 laps.

    Max is also the 20th driver in history to have raced more than 10,000 laps. There are now 7 drivers on the grid with more than 10,000 laps racing experience (Alonso, Lewis, Perez, Ricciardo, Bottas, Hulkenberg and Max), Sainz needs 167 more laps to become the 21st in history and 8th on the grid.

    With his 18th consecutive pole to win conversion, Max is now tied with Senna in 4th with 29 wins starting from pole.
    Excluding the 5 drivers that only scored a single pole and won, Max has by far the highest pole to win conversion of any driver in history with 85.3% (29 wins from 34 poles), next best conversion rate is 66.7% (4 wins from 6 poles).

    With Max scoring his 100th podium he joined the elite 100 podium club at age 26yr5m beating Vettel by more than 4 years. Alonso joined last year at the age of 41yr7m making him the oldest to join.
    Max is the 3rd driver to score 100 podiums with a single team, Schumacher did it with Ferrari (116) and Lewis with Mercedes (148).

    Winning 19 of the last 20 races has increased Max win % from 22.2% to 29.9% surpassing Schumacher 29.6% (91 wins in 307 races).
    With Lewis failing to win in the last 47 races Max will overtake Lewis if he wins the next 2 races, Max 58 wins in 189 races = 30.69% and Lewis 103 wins in 336 races = 30.65%.

    At the end of 2013 Lewis had 22 wins out of 129 races (17.1%) and won the championship once out of 3 years he had a championship contending car. In the Mercedes WCC winning years he won 81 races from 159 races (50.9%) and 6 out of 8 WDC raising his win % from 17.1% to 35.8%, since that has dropped back down to 30.8% (103 wins in 334 races).

    1. Awesome stats! Thank you!

    2. For new fans it might also be weird to see mclaren still ahead of red bull and merc and williams only being overtaken now, considering mclaren hasn’t had a championship contender in 12 years and williams in 21.

    3. The final stat really shows the effect of a dominant car in these statistics.

      1. Indeed very true – Schumacher relative % stats would have stayed better if he hadn’t returned and raced in uncompetitive Mercedes from 2010-2012 (Mercedes was 4th, 4th and 5th in WCC).
        91 wins out of 249 races = 36.5% instead of now 91 wins out of 307 races = 29.6%.
        154 podiums / 249 races = 61.8% instead of now 155 podiums / 307 races = 50.5%

    4. Max has overtaken Schuey in the wins-per-race stat, and soon will overtake Lewis too, all very expectable. The funny and unexpected thing is that Schuey is also going to overtake Lewis. Unless Lewis retires right away, that is.

  3. “Verstappen also picked up his 100th podium trophy. Impressively, he took just 188 starts to do so”

    That was actually an error making Max’s joking answer “missing 88 podiums” even funnier, as Max had his 187th start in Saudi Arabia not 188th.

    1. Ah, serves me right for not checking that number. Thanks, I’ve corrected it.

    2. Wow, verstappen almost has as many races as prost already, that’s impressive at his age and after the amount of seasons he was in f1 for.

  4. Congratulations Keith, F1Fanatic being older than a driver is quite incredible!

  5. Is Bearman the first driver to participate in official F2 and F1 sessions on the same race weekend?

    1. Possibly as I struggle to recall any other substitute driver racing in F2 at the time of substituting.

    2. Not if you’re including P1 / P2 as official sessions. Definitely been some junior drivers take the P1 seat, then hop back into F2. Norris definitely did. Usually occurred at Abu Dhabi.

    3. Depends how you define this. Back in the 60s, the races at Nürburgring usually also saw F2 cars running in the same race as F1 cars, so you could say they participated in both F1 and F2 sessions.

  6. Thanks Keith for making us feel old!
    Also good job keeping your blog up and running for so long that it’s now legal drinking age. It turned out well if I do say so myself.

    1. I’ll give that a thumbs up. Been reading this site for years….

  7. New lede: Newey overtakes Newey for wins

    Also amazing that this newspaper is older than Bearman.

    It’s been a small but fixed part of my life for a long time.

  8. Not a stat per se, but a fun fact nonetheless. Oliver Berman was born on a race day. On 8th of May 2005, his birthday, F1 raced in the Spanish Grand Prix on Circuit de Catalunya. Kimi Raikkonen in a McLaren-Mercedes won ahead of Alonso and Trulli.

    1. The only other driver for which this is true is Zhou, who was born on Sunday 30 May 1999, the day of the Spanish GP won by Häkkinen.

      I did notice that Alonso was born on the wedding day of King Charles III. That’s nice… I guess.

      Looking up these birthdays also makes one feel very old.

      1. And, in addition, Zhou’s birthday was also the date of that year’s Indy 500, which was won by Kenny Bräck.

      2. Tommy Scragend
        13th March 2024, 0:43

        Where Bearman trumps Zhou here is that there was a driver on the grid on his (Bearman’s) debut who was also on the grid on the day he was born! (Alonso of course)

    2. @xivizmath MichaelN
      While I’d already noted the 2005 Spanish GP race day coincidence before, I’d never noticed the others, so a good amount of birthday coincidences.

  9. If Alonso is retroactively disqualified from ‘that race’, Williams will be able to add another race win to that tally.

    1. True, and it might also be their “last win” considering the current situation and the fact it’s very difficult to get back on top for anyone, let alone struggling teams.

  10. Bearman also stands out in one respect as far as RaceFans is concerned: He is the first driver to race in Formula 1 who was born after the website you are reading was founded!

    I can’t believe that I’m old enough for a driver to drive in F1 being half my age. I remember that 2005 season vividly, as if it happened really not that long ago.

    1. The classic, the older you get the faster time seems to go. Much more things feel like yesterday but were years ago. Started following when I was 14 (in ’99)…enough stuff I remember like yesteday, yet already feeling like i’m getting old at 38. xD

      1. Wow, I also started following in 1999, and while I’m a bit younger I agree time passes too fast!

    2. @fer-no65 Tjitse @esploratore1 You three are still very young as i went to my first GP in 1963 …. even Alonso is a young driver for me :)
      Still how older you are the time goes faster isn’t an fable. Your bodyclock is that what gives you this feeling. How older you became how less you sleep (you still need your rest for your body) feeling you have.

      So how old you feel is in your mind …. :)

  11. Speaking of young drivers, the 1990s look quite bad on the stats.

    You’ve got Pérez (1990) winning 6 races, Sainz (1994) 2 wins, Gasly and Ocon (1996) 1 win each, Leclerc (1997) 5 wins, and then Russell (1998) just 1. That’s 16 race wins in total!

    That’s it… aside from Verstappen, also from 1997.

    But that’s really low for a whole decade. Part of this is due to Vettel and Hamilton winning such a huge number of races from 2010-2020, of course, but it’s still very slim pickings for so many years.

    1. Yes, but in the end it’s due to the higher influx of dominant cars: 1992-2010 we have 19 years with 6 (at best) dominant cars: 1992 williams, 1993 williams, 1996 williams, 2001 ferrari, 2002 ferrari, 2004 ferrari.

      2011-2024 we have 14 years with 10 dominant cars: 2011 red bull, 2013 red bull, mercedes 2014, 2015, 2016, 2019, 2020 and red bull 2022, 2023, 2024, so that’s a 70% dominant rate compared to the less than 50% one before.

      Some might question the 2019 merc, but that’s very similar to the 2001 ferrari in terms of competitiveness, so remove one and you remove the other one too.

      The problem is basically mercedes and red bull getting the hang of it, the teams that were top teams before don’t seem to have an answer to them (ferrari, mclaren, williams).

  12. Jonathan Parkin
    12th March 2024, 20:05

    Nico now only has four races to beat Andrea DeCesaris

    1. We might as well give him the record already, unless he retires from f1 within 4 races, him winning a race is a completely unrealistic scenario.

      1. Jonathan Parkin
        13th March 2024, 11:56

        Ah you say that, but the situation could arise where he does end up winning within the next four rounds thus resetting the record

  13. Bearman is the first driver to score points on his debut since Nyck de Vries, who was also a one-off replacement for a driver suffering appendicitis.

    Only current tracks at which Verstappen has yet to achieve pole position: Baku, Las Vegas, Miami, Shanghai, Singapore.

    Neither Ocon nor Gasly failed to reach Q3 at this circuit in 2021-23, but both went out in Q1 this weekend.

    Bearman’s first points keep alive the run of at least 1 maiden points-scorer every season since 1970.

    The two circuits that F1 has raced at so far in 2024 are the only 2 where Leclerc has set Fastest Lap twice.

    30th consecutive season in which at least 1 Mercedes-powered car has led a lap at some point.

    36th consecutive season in which at least 1 British driver has led a lap at some point.

    Thanks to statsf1 and the official F1 site for some of these.

    1. Bearman’s first points keep alive the run of at least 1 maiden points-scorer every season since 1970.

      That’s a very long streak that might well have ended this year. Nice find!

      1. I guess that’s why ferrari decided to do something about it and get a good debutant driver, couldn’t have a 54 years streak end!

  14. First time three Ferrari drivers are in the top 10 of the driver championship since 1999? (Schumacher, Irvine, Salo).

  15. The graph shows a rather similar trend between the teams. Interested to see what will become of RedBull and whether they can continue their streak. Huge Newey factor.

    1. Four British drivers in a points scoring row, Russell 6th, Bearman 7th, Norris 8th, Hamilton 9th.
      I don’t know if it is for first time. Or any nationality.

      1. Can do better, 5 British drivers in a row AND they are the top 5 positions AND its their home Grand Prix. Don’t know of any other examples better than this

        Clark 1st
        Hill 2nd
        Surtees 3rd
        Spence 4th
        Stewart 5th

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1965_British_Grand_Prix

  16. 2012, when Williams took their last win with Pastor Maldonado, was a remarkable season in that six different teams and eight different drivers won GPs, far in excess of the numbers since. Unless I’ve forgotten someone, all the race wins since 2012 have gone to RB, Merc, and Ferrari, apart from 2012 when Raikkonen won the opening race in the Lotus, and 2021 when Ricciardo in the McLaren and Ocon in the Alpine both picked up race wins. Surely that says there is something desperately wrong with the sport when two thirds of the field is just there to make up the numbers.

  17. It’s amusing in this context to think of what was Sir Frank’s nickname in the paddock until he finally made his breakthrough. But in his case it was meant merely as an affectionate legpull about his perennial lack of success. If it was applied to the team principal who has just overtaken him in terms of race wins, it might be a reference to certain screenshots allegedly referencing his in-flight activities. Then again, it could just be a character reference. Though, if the latter, it’s difficult to decide who at that unhappy team is the most egregious example amidst the current tantrums and squabbles.
    Give me Sir Frank and Sir Patrick anyday. Form is temporary but class is permanent (I except Adrian Newey from my observations about the Red Bull gang – being a Grove alumnus has clearly rubbed off on him, if that isn’t too unfortunate an expression in the context of his old boss’s nickname).

  18. You missed Sergio Perez in a Force India winning the Bahrain race in 2020.

    Historically 6 or more different constructors winning a race is rare with just 7 seasons meeting that criteria (1975, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1983 and 2012), 1982 holds the record as only year having 7 different constructor winning a race.

    On the other end there have been 10 seasons with just 2 constructors winning a race (1950, 1952, 1961, 1988, 2000, 2007, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2023)

    In terms of unpredictability, multiple winners, changing world champions from season to season it looks like the 70′ & 80′ were the golden years of F1.

    Although from 1970-1989 15 different constructors won at least 1 race, since 2000 there also have been 15 different constructors winning at least 1 race.
    Looking at different driver winners there is a big gap with 43 different winners from 1970-1989 and only 28 different drivers winning at least 1 race since 2000.

    Only looking at the hybrid era (2014-2024) there have only be 7 different constructors winning with only 3 constructors winning more than 1 race (McLaren, Force India, Alpine and Alpha Tauri all just winning 1) – that means 98.1% (202 of 206) hybrid era races have been won by Mercedes, Red Bull or Ferrari.
    In terms of drivers, only 13 different drivers won a race with 5 only winning a single race and 2 drivers winning 66.5% (137 of 206) of races.

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