F1

New races must stop

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 92 total)
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  • #220830
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @brazil2007 In my opinion, the pressure placed on the drivers over the course of the race weekend makes things exciting. On such a tight circuit, the smallest mistake can end a driver’s weekend, no matter how well it may have been going. Take Romain Grosjean, for example. Despite having a good qualifying session, a mistake at the start ended his race. On a wider circuit, Schumacher would have had more space to get out of Grosjean’s way, and the crash might have been avoided. Instead, Grosjean was sent home with yet another DNF to his name.

    To me, proper wheel-to-wheel racing, combined with unpredictability, makes a good race. I also like races in which strategies are unique, such as this year’s Italian or Brazilian Grands Prix.

    #220831
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    To me, proper wheel-to-wheel racing […] makes a good race.

    How can you have “proper wheel-to-wheel” racing without any overtaking? Isn’t overtaking another car the whole point of being wheel-to-wheel with them in the first place?

    #220832
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @prisoner-monkeys You can have a good wheel-to-wheel battle with the driver that started the battle ahead winding up ahead. No position changes are necessary.

    #220833
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    No position changes are necessary.

    Then why don’t you just decide the race winner based on whoever finishes on top in the first practice session?

    #220834
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    I’l get busy sending out those messages: “Hey, Fernando Alonso! You know, you don’t have to win the race in order for the fans to be excited. Why go to all that trouble of passing Sebastian Vettelm when you can just pull alongside him for a little bit? Sure, if you finish second, you won’t be World Champion, but that’s okay because you will have been entertaining, and isn’t that what really counts?”

    #220835
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @prisoner-monkeys Winning a race should require consistency, smoothness, and the ability to remain focused for long periods of time. The whole point of each race weekend is the race itself. Practice is there to fine tune the car’s setup, as well as getting a feel for the track. Practice is merely part of the build up to the actual race. Deciding the winner based on the first practice session would be a bad choice for the sport in very many ways. When I said that no position changes are necessary, I meant that no position changes are necessary in order for a good battle for position to occur, I’m all for some non-DRS overtaking now and then, because as a result, the driver who really deserves to win has a good chance to win, and the driver who set the fastest lap in practice will have to work hard all weekend to win the race.

    #220836
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @prisoner-monkeys Drivers don’t get paid for entertaining ‘fans’, they get paid to perform well and finish as high as they can.

    #220837
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    Once again, your posts contradict your previous statements on the subject.

    #220838
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    How so?

    #220839
    NickV
    Member

    I find myself agreeing with Joey, this years Monaco GP was one of the most exciting of the year for me, the tension towards the end was mega, one mistake by one of six drivers would have changed everything.

    Overtaking is important but F1 is not and never has been about hundreds of overtakes a race. If that is what you want watch NASCAR. The rate we’re going with these fake DRS overtakes, it will be like NASCAR where 95% of overtakes are not mentioned by commentators as they are too regular and therefore not special enough to warrant mentioning. Don’t get me wrong I do enjoy overtakes and they are important to each race, but I like to see a driver have to work hard to overtake as this makes it more exciting, as does the fact it is a more rare occurrence and therefore more special and rewarding when it does happen.

    #220840
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    How so?

    Because you claim that “proper wheel-to-wheel racing” is entertaining, but then you claim “consistency, smoothness, and the ability to remain focused for long periods of time” is the essence of racing. That’s a contradiction because when you’re racing wheel-to-wheel, the notions of consistency, smoothness and focus take a back seat. Nobody is going to pass a car by lapping consistently; they need to seize the opportunities that are offered. Nor are they going to pass the car in front by being smooth; you need to be aggressive in attacking, because if you hesitate, the other driver will close the door. Why do you think drivers were conserving their tyres a lot early this year? It was because they wanted to have as much life as possible left in them when they made their move. And when you say “focus”, I’m assuming you mean a focus on consistency and smoothness, which isn’t going to work, either; drivers need to be focused on finding the right moment to strike and take the position, not worrying about setting consistent laptimes.

    Finally, you say that overtaking is not necessary to great racing. But to paraphrase Ayrton Senna slightly, if you don’t go after an overtake and pounce on it when it presents itself, you are not a racing driver.

    #220841
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I think you’ve now lost my whole point. I’m not saying drivers should not ATTEMPT to overtake when they can, I said that more overtaking does not equal more entertaining racing. If drivers drove around without ever trying to overtake, that would become somewhat dull. You have to keep in mind, however, that the driver in front will be pushing every bit as much as the driver behind him. Overtaking is not essential to great racing, but drivers putting effort in, and attempting to gain a position when they have an opportunity to is.

    #220842
    Nick
    Participant

    @Prisoner-Monkeys

    Just let him go. I’ve been reading his posts on the past 2 pages, you’ll note he’s VERY selective in what he replies to, he usually replies to snippets and sarcastic comments. I think @Joey-Zyla wouldn’t be a good F1 driver, since he lacks consistency, smoothness, and the ability to remain focused for long periods of time.

    I’m sure his ways of ‘efforts matter more than results’ would do great in schools, the military and business as well. It’s a shame we lost half a million pounds last quarter, but at least we made an effort to sell exploding kneecaps.

    #220843
    Nick
    Participant

    I find myself agreeing with Joey, this years Monaco GP was one of the most exciting of the year for me, the tension towards the end was mega, one mistake by one of six drivers would have changed everything.

    Well, how would this have been different at the Hockenheimring or Yas Marina? They probably would have overtaken each other, with more one-on-one battles, perhaps a less close finish, but I’m more excited about potential overtakes than I am about potential failures. A driver can make mistakes at any track, and while Monaco is less forgiving than most, it probably would lead to a safety car period, draining from the race.

    #220844
    Bob
    Participant

    I think it all boils down to a fundamental disagreement over the conditions which define an “interesting” race. Pardon me if I have misinterpreted your viewpoints, and feel free to correct my statements, but as I see it:

    @joey-zyla seems to advocate what I will term Definition A, that an “interesting” race is derived not just by the swapping of positions, but by the effort that drivers expend in navigating “difficult” tracks like Monaco, and making attempts to overtake, regardless of whether these attempts are successful, thereby creating a sense of tension.

    @prisoner-monkeys seems to advocate Definition B, whereby an “interesting” race comes from having multiple drivers of relatively equal pace and competitiveness, creating multiple opportunities for, and instances of, overtaking, resulting in a visual spectacle, and race results that could very well have ramifications for the championship.

    It is difficult to make a definitive blanket statement like “more overtaking does not produce more interesting racing”, when there are so many variables to consider – were the overtakes considered “difficult to accomplish”, did the track layout contribute to the ease of overtaking, were those overtakes mostly DRS “highway pass”, or were they “instant classics”, and so on.

    Personally, I lean toward Definition B. As a general rule of thumb, I tend to regard a race where drivers succeed on trading positions and altering the results, as being more interesting than a race where finishing positions are set in stone by the end of the first corner/lap. Like all subjective judgements, it seems to be a matter of personal taste/preference. (Once again, if I have misconstrued your views, feel free to correct me.)

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