F1

A viewing Boycot if Bahrain is now NOT cancelled?

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 124 total)
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  • #161774
    Slr
    Participant

    It’s the lack of attention the media are giving the situation in Bahrain. Because the media think Libya and Japan is more interesting, it’s easy to presume that Bahrain is fine now. Having said that, as I was writing this a quick 30 second piece on Bahrain just popped up on BBC news just now, though that’s not saying much.

    #161775
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    It’s kind of understandable I suppose: the mess in Libya is basically civil war, and the Japanese earthquake/ tsunami was seemingly one of the most catastrophic natural disasters in decades, so it’s no surprise a few people being shot at on a little island in the Gulf is being ignored. In fact, I was amazed the first wave of protests in Bahrain got such widespread media attention- I reckon the GP must have contributed to that

    #161776
    BasCB
    Participant

    Sadly what we are seeing in Bahrain in the past days, it looks like this has turned about as bad as in Libya.

    The official Bahrain “media” and the government are talking about “terrorists” and “racistst” when they mean the people standing up for their rights. Then they started shooting them and beating them up.

    That is no way to “protect” the civilians of the country. It is giving in to selfish thoughts about not giving up ones position and neighbours being afraid of having to give up power themselves.

    Now from experience, that is the best way to breed terrorism, as shown numerous times before.

    For me this makes it pretty likely that I will boycott the Bahrain GP in the unlikely case it gets on the calender this year.

    #161777
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    Well it’s similar to Libya but on a smaller scale, because Bahrain has a much smaller population and none of the vast open spaces that Libya has, and the government. But yeah, any respect I had for the prince after he temporarily called off the violence last month has dissipated. I *swearword*ing hate such brutal dictatorships

    #161778
    Alianora La Canta
    Participant

    It’s not entirely clear if the Crown Prince is responsible for this latest violence or whether the King gave the order. What is clear is that the two sides are further away from peace than they were in the immediate aftermath of the Grand Prix’s postponement. At this rate I can see it turning into a full cancellation.

    #161779
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1367637/Symbol-defiance-Bahrain-government-tears-statue-uses-focus-pro-democracy-protests.html

    They’ve gone and torn down the Pearl Square monument. Nice to see they’ve got their priorities right eh… Who needs democracy when you can just get smashy?

    #161780
    Ads21
    Participant

    “It’s not entirely clear if the Crown Prince is responsible for this latest violence or whether the King gave the order. “

    I think its clear that the Crown Prince was at the head of the Moderate faction of the Ruling family, urging dialogue with protesters and introducing reforms. At the beginning of the protests it seems that the Crown Prince had the upper hand in the discussions in the regime. But the Saudis were extremely nervous about what any democratic reforms or threat of instability would mean for them and seeing the weak US administration not giving backing to reform movements it decided that the protests in Bahrain could be easily crushed.

    Whether or not the Saudis were actually invited is still uncertain but its clear its influence in supporting hard-liners was far greater than any western backing for the moderate forces in the regime. The situation is now pretty tragic for Bahrain as before the crackdown it still had a good chance of having serious, stable political reforms towards a more constitutional monarchy. Serious attempts at reform early in the crisis would have certainly pacified protesters who were not seeking the overthrow of the royal family. Now we have a chaotic situation where the chances of democratic change have been nearly extinguished.

    #161781
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    And the reputation of the country has been absolutely torn to shreds. Before this all happened I saw Bahrain as a stable, prosperous and free (by regional standards) country. Now I wouldn’t go near it with a metaphorical 10 foot barge pole

    #161782
    BasCB
    Participant

    @Ads21 Hard to say with the CK, I got the same impression as you with him on the more pro-talks and reforms side. If so, that side looks to be on the losing side of the elites.

    As for the Saudis being invited … Its hardly the first time foreign countries being worried about developments were “invited” by the receiving governments to “suppport”, more often than not it was a occupation.

    I would be very supprised, if the invitation got there without serious pressure from the surrounding, <strike>invading,</strike> sorry supporting countries.

    Getting rid of the monument really shows how deluded the informations are that get to the ruling elites. Do they really think, that changing the name of the roundabout and destroying the monument makes their people forget?

    Surely the best way to give Iran more influence and possibly breed terrorists who see no other way to get their disconsent noticed.

    #161783
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/90941

    Sorry to bring this up again- obviously now the title of the thread is a bit redundant, but clearly the issue of the Bahrain GP is still relevant.

    I saw this story on Autosport, and I think what the activists are saying makes absolute sense. I know F1 is notorious for its lack of morals and sentiment, but surely even Bernie Ecclestone has some sort of conscience. Of course, reinstating the GP could damage F1’s reputation and thus cost him money in the long run, but I’d like to think if he cancelled the race it would be at least partly because he understood that what is happening in Bahrain right now is simply unacceptable

    #161784
    Prisoner Monkeys
    Participant

    We’re protesting against bahrain by building a banked corner in Abu Dhabi?

    I think this is the story you were after: http://www.autosport.com/news/report.php/id/90941

    I still believe that if the race is cancelled outright, it should not be for political reaons.

    #161785
    Ned Flanders
    Participant

    Haha, oops. I’ve changed it now. Incidentally, I reckon that banked corner will still be rubbish, but that’s for another thread…

    #161786
    Bradley Downton
    Participant

    Like this one!… Ok, no i wont start it. Tempting though…

    As for Bahrain, i dont think the race should go ahead, it’s no better now than it was earlier in the year. The media just got bored.

    #161787
    Chippie
    Participant

    To be fair to the media re: @Bradley13 “The media just got bored”, the media just give us what we want as information, and right now we’d prefer to hear about the Royal Wedding and Libya, it can’t report everything.

    #161788
    Scribe
    Participant

    I think in the light of the infomation Keiths posted, this race would be akin to racing in apartheid South Africa, legitamising a regime clearly complicit in massive human rights abuses.

    Some say they don’t think the race should be cancelled for political reasons, PM in this thread, unfortunatley thats impossible. F1, like it or not is a world institution and therefore it’s patronage is highly political. We must not go to Bahrain, an if we do, I’ll certainly not be watching Jake Humphrey and co deal with their gags on mentioning the protests. Or the Prince blithly welcome us to his wonderfull project, it’d be intolerable. Unfortunatley dramtically reduced veiwing figures is the only way the message will get through.

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