Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes, Red Bull Ring, 2017

2017 Austrian Grand Prix grid

2017 Austrian Grand Prix

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Row 11. Valtteri Bottas 1’04.251
Mercedes
2. Sebastian Vettel 1’04.293
Ferrari
Row 23. Kimi Raikkonen 1’04.779
Ferrari
4. Daniel Ricciardo 1’04.896
Red Bull
Row 35. Max Verstappen 1’04.983
Red Bull
6. Romain Grosjean 1’05.480
Haas
Row 47. Sergio Perez 1’05.605
Force India
8. Lewis Hamilton* 1’04.424
Mercedes
Row 59. Esteban Ocon 1’05.674
Force India
10. Carlos Sainz Jnr 1’05.726
Toro Rosso
Row 611. Nico Hulkenberg 1’05.597
Renault
12. Fernando Alonso 1’05.602
McLaren
Row 713. Stoffel Vandoorne 1’05.741
McLaren
14. Daniil Kvyat 1’05.884
Toro Rosso
Row 815. Kevin Magnussen No time
Haas
16. Jolyon Palmer 1’06.345
Renault
Row 917. Felipe Massa 1’06.534
Williams
18. Lance Stroll 1’06.608
Williams
Row 1019. Marcus Ericsson 1’06.857
Sauber
20. Pascal Wehrlein 1’07.011
Sauber

*Five-place penalty for gearbox change

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Keith Collantine
Lifelong motor sport fan Keith set up RaceFans in 2005 - when it was originally called F1 Fanatic. Having previously worked as a motoring...

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14 comments on “2017 Austrian Grand Prix grid”

    1. Sundar Srinivas Harish
      8th July 2017, 13:53

      Thank you.

  1. Chocolates to boiled lollies for williams in 2 races

  2. So Fernando out-qualified Vandoorne even with an older engine (and worse) engine. Had Fernando got the new engine and just been 2 tenths faster (easily possible given yesterday’s times of the Spec3), Fernando would have been 6th on the grid! What a driver!

    1. Fernando is another reason to bring back Kubica if he is ready… the older drivers at the moment seem to be faster than all the rookies coming through.

  3. Am I the only one having this track growing on me? Those gravel traps are genius to me. Classic gravel traps but with a twist in form of the tarmac surrounding the gravel and joining the track again. The driver is slowed down and punished for his mistake as per normal, but has the chance to join the race again, and shake the worst of the gravel off again, before rejoining the track. Simple, but effective. Love it!

  4. What was the thinking in Mercedes camp when they chose SS tyres as race-starters for Hamilton? How are they going to help him now from P8? Even though the SS tyres are theoretically capable of longer stints than their US counterparts, will not the tyre wear factor be much greater for Hamilton (then the front-runners) in the first 7 or 8 laps of the race as he tries to overtake those ahead?

    Also, with Verstappen and Grosjean in front of him, there is more than a slight risk of first lap incidents.

    1. Given the short lap, there is high chance of traffic and safety cars. This means that there is less chance of maximising potential of the ultra softs. Hence, the gamble to start on SS becomes more attractive.

      1. Given the short lap, there is high chance of traffic and safety cars. This means that there is less chance of maximising potential of the ultra softs. Hence, the gamble to start on SS becomes more attractive.

        What if the SS-tyre runner was one of the reasons for the Safety Car to come out?

        1. What I am saying is that as soon as a safety car comes out in the early part of the race, the advantage shifts towards Hamilton as other ultrasoft runners can’t use their pace advantage.

          The cause of the safety car doesn’t matter, the timing is more important

  5. Kimi got third, why wasn’t he part of the qualy inyerview instead of Ham?

    1. Ben Rowe (@thegianthogweed)
      8th July 2017, 17:57

      Because Hamilton got the 3rd fastest time. Isn’t that obvious? The penalty only takes place when they actually start. Hamilton did still qualify 3rd so he should have been in the interview.

  6. Excellent driving by Perez when it counts. Perhaps if VER goes to Ferrari Perez can go to Red Bull.

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